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Stuttard’s Septic Seven – update #3

By Nigel Somerville, the Deputy Sheriff of AIM | Saturday 31 December 2016


Disclosure: I have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from ShareProphets). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.


In order to show us all what faith Marcus Stuttard, the head of AIM, has in his team of oxymorons at AIM Regulation ShareProphets has selected a beautifully diversified portfolio of stocks for him to invest his own money into. Of course, all seven have been Red Flagged on this website but since was all know that all is well with the regulation of the world’s most successful growth market we are sure that Mr Stuttard will want to demonstrate his trust. At the last update his portfolio was down by 11.6% after two months. Has it fared any better in months three as we close out 2016?

African Potash (AFPO) is on the cusp of being delisted from AIM (currently suspended) but fear not as the stock can now be traded on the ISDX lobster-pot. Well, you can buy at any rate. But after Friday's no-one-is-watching o'clock (4.18pm, almost 4 hours after the market closed for the New Year break) disastrous deadline day results, I fancy that selling at all when markets resume in the new year will be a tad difficult.

Here are the year-end numbers for the portfolio, three months on from inception:

 

start (mid)

now (mid)

Change %

AFG

12.5

14

12.0

AFPO

0.185

0.06

-67.6

CNEL

1.525

1.475

-3.3

CTAG

18

9.25

-48.6

EDEN

11.5

11.5

0.0

JSI

3

4.75

58.3

TAIH

2.75

3

9.1

       
   

Average %

-5.7

 

Well it seems that Mr Stuttard can enjoy the festive cheer as the losses are down to just 5.7% since our last update on 27 November.

It is also good to see the sales-free and (thus far) product-free CloudTag bouncing higher again. L1 will be delighted as it continues to work the death spiral loan conversion stock through the market. Quite why the Nomad hasn’t quit is a real mystery. One can only think it is under a spell of some sort – or just so strapped for cash and so mercenary that all moral principle has long departed the scene. Perhaps Cairn enjoys being made a laughing stock as RNS after RNS that it signs off is shown to be, shall we say, not exactly fully aligned with the actualitees.

The star performer is the China Norfolk Jiasen (JSI), purveyor of wooden doors and panelling from Fujian Province in China. Of course, this company used to claim on all its RNSs that it had in excess of 1400 and then 1500 employees – until our correspondent went on a site visit and the claim was quietly dropped.

Let’s see….Fujian Province…..Naibu (NBU), Camkids (CAMK), China Chaintek (CTEK) – all delisted following Nomad resignations, all frauds.

Nothing to worry about there, then.

We will continue to follow this fine portfolio – watch this space for further updates.


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