The End Of (Artificial) Stability

By David Scott | Monday 12 March 2018


There are many ways of assessing the value of the stock market. The Shiller PE (price relative to the past decade’s worth of real, average earnings) and Tobin’s Q (the value of companies’ outstanding stock and debt relative to their replacement cost) are possibly the two best. That doesn’t mean those metrics are accurate crash indicators, or that one can use them profitably as trading signals. Expensive stocks can stay expensive or get more expensive, and cheap stocks can stay cheap or get cheaper for inconveniently and expensively long periods of time. But those metrics do have a good record of forecasting future long-term (one decade or more) returns.

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